Singapore Companies Act - Chapter 50 - Judicial Management

Singapore Companies Act Singapore Companies Act Singapore Companies Act Singapore Companies Act

PART VIIIA

JUDICIAL MANAGEMENT

Application to Court for a company to be placed under judicial management and for appointment of a judicial manager

227A.  Where a company or where a creditor or creditors of the company consider that —

(a) the company is or will be unable to pay its debts; and

(b) there is a reasonable probability of rehabilitating the company or of preserving all or part of its business as a going concern or that otherwise the interests of creditors would be better served than by resorting to a winding up, an application may be made to the Court under section 227B for an order that the company should be placed under the judicial management of a judicial manager.

Power of Court to make a judicial management order and appoint a judicial manager

227B.

—(1)  Where a company or its directors (pursuant to a resolution of its members or the board of directors) or a creditor or creditors (including any contingent or prospective creditor or creditors or all or any of those parties, together or separately), pursuant to section 227A, makes an application (referred to in this section as an application for a judicial management order) for an order that the company should be placed under the judicial management of a judicial manager, the Court may make a judicial management order in relation to the company if, and only if, —

(a) it is satisfied that the company is or will be unable to pay its debts; and

(b) it considers that the making of the order would be likely to achieve one or more of the following purposes, namely:

(i) the survival of the company, or the whole or part of its undertaking as a going concern;

(ii) the approval under section 210 of a compromise or arrangement between the company and any such persons as are mentioned in that section;

(iii) a more advantageous realisation of the company’s assets would be effected than on a winding up

[13/87; 42/2005]

(2)  Any judicial management order made under subsection (1) shall direct that during the period in which the order is in force the affairs, business and property of the company shall be managed by a judicial manager appointed for the purpose by the Court; and such an order shall specify the purpose or purposes for whose achievement the order is made.

(3)  (a)  In any application for a judicial management order under subsection (1), the applicant shall nominate a person who is a public accountant, who is not the auditor of the company, to act as a judicial manager

(b) The Court may reject the nomination of the applicant and appoint another person in his stead.

(c) Where a nomination is made by the company, a majority in number and value of the creditors (including contingent or prospective creditors) may be heard in opposition to the nomination and the Court may, if satisfied as to the value of the creditors’ claims and as to the grounds of opposition, invite the creditors to nominate a person in his stead and, if it sees fit, adopt their nomination.

(d) Nothing in this subsection shall prevent the Minister from himself nominating a person to act as a judicial manager if he considers that the public interest so requires and in such a case the Minister may be heard in support of his nomination and for this purpose may be represented.

(e) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), where a person is appointed by the Court or nominated by the Minister to act as a judicial manager that person need not be a public accountant

[13/87; 5/2004]

(4)  When an application for a judicial management order is made to the Court, notice of the application —

(a) shall be published in the Gazette and in an English and Chinese local daily newspaper and a copy thereof sent to the Registrar; and

(b) shall be given —

(i) to the company, in a case where a creditor is the applicant; and

(ii) to any person who has appointed or is or may be entitled to appoint a receiver and manager of the whole (or substantially the whole) of a company’s property under the terms of any debentures of a company secured by a floating charge or by a floating charge and one or more fixed charges. In the case of any such floating charge created by an instrument before 15th May 1987, it shall be deemed to contain a power to appoint a receiver and manager in the event that an application under this section is made for the appointment of a judicial manager with the result that the holder of that floating charge shall, in accordance with this paragraph, be given notice of the application

[13/87; 42/2005]

(5)  Subject to subsection (10), the Court shall dismiss an application for a judicial management order if it is satisfied that —

(a) a receiver and manager referred to in subsection (4) has been or will be appointed; or

(b) the making of the order is opposed by a person who has appointed or is entitled to appoint such a receiver and manager.

(6)  On hearing the application for a judicial management order, the Court may dismiss the application or adjourn the hearing conditionally or unconditionally or make an interim order or any other order that it thinks fit.

(7)  A judicial management order shall not be made in relation to a company —

(a) after the company has gone into liquidation;

(b) where the company is a bank licensed under the Banking Act (Cap. 19) or is a finance company licensed under the Finance Companies Act (Cap. 108); or

(c) where the company is an insurance company licensed under the Insurance Act (Cap. 142).

(8)  A judicial management order shall, unless it is otherwise discharged, remain in force for a period of 180 days from the date of the making of the order but the Court may, on application of a judicial manager, increase this period subject to such terms as the Court may impose.

(9)  The costs and expenses of any unsuccessful application for a judicial management order made under this section shall, unless the Court otherwise orders, be borne by the applicant and, if the Court considers that the application is frivolous or vexatious, it may make such orders, as it thinks just and equitable, to redress any injustice that may have resulted.

(10)  Nothing in this section shall preclude a Court —

(a) from making a judicial management order and appointing a judicial manager if it considers the public interest so requires; or

(b) from appointing, after the making of an application for a judicial management order and on the application of the person applying for the judicial management order, an interim judicial manager, pending the making of a judicial management order, and such interim judicial manager may, if the Court sees fit, be the person nominated in the application for a judicial management order. The interim judicial manager so appointed may exercise such functions, powers and duties as the Court may specify in the order

[13/87; 42/2005]

(11)  For the purposes of this Part, “property” in relation to a company includes money, goods, things in action and every description of property, whether real or personal, and whether in Singapore or elsewhere, and also obligations and every description of interest whether present or future or vested or contingent arising out of, or incidental to, property.

(12)  The definition in section 254(2) of “inability to pay debts” shall apply for the purposes of this section as it applies for the purposes of Division 2 of Part X.

Effect of application for a judicial management order

227C.  During the period beginning with the making of an application for a judicial management order and ending with the making of such an order or the dismissal of the application —

(a) no resolution shall be passed or order made for the winding up of the company;

(b) no steps shall be taken to enforce any charge on or security over the company’s property or to repossess any goods in the company’s possession under any hire-purchase agreement, chattels leasing agreement or retention of title agreement, except with leave of the Court and subject to such terms as the Court may impose; and

(c) no other proceedings and no execution or other legal process shall be commenced or continued and no distress may be levied against the company or its property except with leave of the Court and subject to such terms as the Court may impose

[13/87; 42/2005]

Effect of judicial management order

227D.

—(1)  On the making of a judicial management order —

(a) any receiver or receiver and manager shall vacate office; and

(b) any application for the winding up of the company shall be dismissed

[13/87; 42/2005]

(2)  Where any receiver and manager has vacated office under subsection (1)(a) —

(a) his remuneration and any expenses properly incurred by him; and

(b) any indemnity to which he is entitled out of the assets of the company, shall be charged on and, subject to subsection (4), paid out of any property which was in his custody or under his control at the time in priority to any security held by the person by or on whose behalf he was appointed.

(3)  Neither a receiver nor a receiver and manager of a company who vacates office under subsection (1)(a) shall be required on or after so vacating office to take steps to comply with any duty imposed on him by section 226.

(4)  During the period for which a judicial management order is in force —

(a) no resolution shall be passed or order made for the winding up of the company;

(b) no receiver and manager of the kind referred to in section 227B(4) of the company shall be appointed;

(c) no other proceedings and no execution or other legal process shall be commenced or continued and no distress may be levied against the company or its property except with the consent of the judicial manager or with leave of the Court and (where the Court gives leave) subject to such terms as the Court may impose; and

(d) no steps shall be taken to enforce security over the company’s property or to repossess any goods under any hire-purchase agreement, chattels leasing agreement or retention of title agreement except with the consent of the judicial manager or with leave of the Court and (where the Court gives leave) subject to such terms as the Court may impose.

Notification of judicial management order

227E.

—(1)  Every invoice, order for goods or business letter which, at a time when a judicial management order is in force in relation to a company, is issued by or on behalf of the company or the judicial manager, being a document on or in which the company’s name appears, shall contain a statement that the affairs, business and property of the company are being managed by the judicial manager.

(2)  If default is made in complying with this section, the company, the judicial manager and any officer of the company who knowingly and wilfully authorises or permits the default shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $10,000 and also to a default penalty.

Vacancy in appointment of judicial manager

227F.  If a vacancy occurs by death, resignation or otherwise in the office of a judicial manager of a company, the Court may, on the application of the company or any creditor or creditors of the company or the Minister, by order, fill the vacancy.

General powers and duties of judicial manager

227G.

—(1)  On the making of a judicial management order, the judicial manager shall take into his custody or under his control all the property to which the company is or appears to be entitled.

(2)  During the period for which a judicial management order is in force, all powers conferred and duties imposed on the directors by this Act or by the memorandum or articles of association of the company shall be exercised and performed by the judicial manager and not by the directors; but nothing in this subsection shall require the judicial manager to call any meetings of the company.

(3)  The judicial manager of a company —

(a) shall do all such things as may be necessary for the management of the affairs, business and property of the company; and

(b) shall do all such other things as the Court may by order sanction.

(4)  Without prejudice to the generality of subsection (3)(a), the powers conferred by that subsection shall include the powers specified in the Eleventh Schedule.

(5)  The judicial manager may apply to the Court for directions in relation to any particular matter arising in connection with the carrying out of his functions.

(6)  Nothing in this section shall be taken as authorising the judicial manager of a company to make any payment towards discharging any debt to which the company was subject on the making of the judicial management order unless —

(a) the making of the payment is sanctioned by the Court or the payment is made in pursuance of a compromise or arrangement so sanctioned; or

(b) the payment is made towards discharging sums secured by a security or payable under a hire-purchase agreement, chattels leasing agreement or retention of title agreement to which section 227H(2), (5) and (6) applies.

(7)  The judicial manager of a company may, if he thinks fit, at any time summon a meeting of the company’s creditors; and the judicial manager shall summon such a meeting if he is directed to do so by the Court.

(8)  Any alteration in the company’s memorandum or articles made by virtue of an order under subsection (3)(b) is of the same effect as if duly made by resolution of the company, and the provisions of this Act apply to the memorandum or articles as so altered accordingly.

(9)  An office copy of an order under subsection (3)(b) sanctioning the alteration of the company’s memorandum or articles shall, within 14 days from the making of the order, be delivered by the judicial manager to the Registrar.

(10)  A person dealing with the judicial manager of a company in good faith and for value shall not be concerned to inquire whether the judicial manager is acting within his powers.

Power to deal with charged property, etc.

227H.

—(1)  The judicial manager of a company may dispose of or otherwise exercise his powers in relation to any property of the company which is subject to a security to which this subsection applies as if the property were not subject to the security.

(2)  Where, on application by the judicial manager of a company, the Court is satisfied that the disposal (with or without other assets) —

(a) of any property of the company subject to a security to which this subsection applies; or

(b) of any goods under a hire-purchase agreement, chattels leasing agreement or retention of title agreement, would be likely to promote one or more of the purposes specified in the judicial management order, the Court may by order authorise the judicial manager to dispose of the property as if it were not subject to the security or to dispose of the goods as if all rights of the owner under the hire-purchase agreement, chattels leasing agreement or retention of title agreement were vested in the company.

(3)  Subsection (1) applies to any security which, as created, was a floating charge and subsection (2) applies to any other security.

(4)  Where any property is disposed of under subsection (1), the holder of the security shall have the same priority in respect of any property of the company directly or indirectly representing the property disposed of as he would have had in respect of the property subject to the security.

(5)  It shall be a condition of an order made under subsection (2) that the net proceeds of the disposal shall be applied towards discharging the sums secured by the security or payable under the hire-purchase agreement, chattels leasing agreement or retention of title agreement and where the net proceeds of the disposal are less than the sums secured by the security or payable under any of those agreements, the holder of the security or the owner of the goods, as the case may be, may prove on a winding up for any balance due to him.

(6)  Where a condition imposed in pursuance of subsection (5) relates to 2 or more securities, that condition shall require the net proceeds of the disposal to be applied towards discharging the sums secured by those securities in the order of their priorities.

(7)  (a)  A copy of an order made under subsection (2) shall, within 14 days after the making of the order, be sent by the judicial manager to the Registrar

(b) Seven days’ notice of an application by the judicial manager to the Court to dispose of property subject to a security under subsection (2) shall be given to the holder of the security or to the owner of the goods which are subject to any of the agreements mentioned in that subsection and the holder or the owner, as the case may be, may oppose the disposal of the property.

(8)  If the judicial manager, without reasonable excuse, fails to comply with subsection (7), he shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $5,000 and also to a default penalty.

(9)  For the purposes of sections 227C and 227D and this section —

“chattels leasing agreement” means an agreement for the bailment of goods which is capable of subsisting for more than 3 months;

“hire-purchase agreement” means a hire-purchase agreement as defined in section 2 of the Hire-Purchase Act (Cap. 125);

“retention of title agreement” means an agreement for the sale of goods to a company, being an agreement —

(a) which does not constitute a charge on the goods; but

(b) under which, if the seller is not paid and the company is wound up, the seller will have priority over all other creditors of the company as respects the goods or any property representing the goods.

(10)  Nothing in this section shall be regarded as prejudicing an application to the Court under section 227R.

Agency and liability for contracts

227I.

—(1)  The judicial manager of a company —

(a) shall be deemed to be the agent of the company;

(b) shall be personally liable on any contract, including any contract of employment, entered into or adopted by him in the carrying out of his functions (except in so far as the contract or a notice under subsection (2) otherwise provides); and

(c) shall be entitled to be indemnified in respect of that liability, and to have his remuneration and expenses defrayed, out of the property of the company which is in his custody or under his control in priority to all other debts except those subject to a security to which section 227H(2) applies.

(2)  Where a contract entered into by the company is adopted by the judicial manager, he may, by notice given to the other party, disclaim any personal liability under that contract.

(3)  For the purposes of this section, the judicial manager is not to be taken to have adopted a contract entered into by the company by reason of anything done or omitted to be done within 28 days after the making of the judicial management order.

(4)  Nothing in this section shall —

(a) limit the right of a judicial manager to seek an indemnity from any other person in respect of contracts entered into by him that are approved by the Court; or

(b) make the judicial manager personally liable for payment of rent under leases held by the company at the time of his appointment.

Vacation of office and release

227J.

—(1)  The judicial manager of a company may at any time be removed from office by order of the Court and may, with leave of the Court and subject to such conditions as the Court may impose, resign his office by giving notice of his resignation to the Court.

(2)  The judicial manager of a company shall vacate office if —

(a) being a public accountant at the time of his appointment, he ceases to be a public accountant; or

(b) the judicial management order is discharged

[13/87; 5/2004]

(3)  Where at any time a person ceases to be a judicial manager of a company whether by virtue of this section or by reason of his death —

(a) any sums payable in respect of any debts or liabilities incurred while he was a judicial manager under contracts entered into by him in the carrying out of his functions; and

(b) any remuneration and expenses properly incurred by him, shall be charged on and paid out of the property of the company in his custody or under his control in priority to all other debts, except those subject to a security to which section 227H(2) applies.

(4)  Where a person ceases to be a judicial manager of a company, he shall, from such time as the Court may determine, be released from any liability in respect of any act or omission by him in the management of the company or otherwise in relation to his conduct as a judicial manager but nothing in this section shall relieve him of any of the liabilities referred to in section 227Q(4).

Information to be given by and to judicial manager

227K.

—(1)  Where a judicial management order has been made, the judicial manager shall —

(a) immediately send to the Registrar a copy of the order;

(b) immediately send to the company and publish a notice of the order in the Gazette and in an English and Chinese local daily newspaper; and

(c) within 28 days after the making of the order, unless the Court otherwise directs, send such a notice to all creditors of the company (so far as he is aware of the addresses), and the Registrar shall enter the copy of the order in his records of the company.

(2)  A statement as to the affairs of the company shall be made out and submitted to the judicial manager in accordance with section 227L within 21 days after receipt by the company of the notice of the judicial management order. Any longer period allowed by the judicial manager shall not exceed 2 months.

(3)  If a person, without reasonable excuse, fails to comply with this section he shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $5,000 and also to a default penalty.

Company’s statement of affairs

227L.

—(1)  The company’s statement of affairs required by section 227K to be submitted to the judicial manager shall show as at the date of the judicial management order —

(a) the particulars of the company’s assets, debts and liabilities;

(b) the names and addresses of its creditors;

(c) the securities held by them respectively;

(d) the dates when the securities were respectively given; and

(e) such further or other information as may be prescribed.

(2)  The statement shall be submitted by, and be verified by, affidavit of one or more of the persons who are, at the date of the judicial management order, the directors and by the person who is at that date the secretary of the company, or by such of the persons mentioned in subsection (3) as the judicial manager may require to submit and verify the statement.

(3)  The persons referred to in subsection (2) are —

(a) those who are or have been officers of the company;

(b) those who have taken part in the company’s formation at any time within one year before the date of the judicial management order;

(c) those who are in the company’s employment, or have been in its employment, and are in the judicial manager’s opinion capable of giving the information required, and in this subsection “employment” includes employment under a contract for services.

(4)  If a person, without reasonable excuse, fails to comply with this section, he shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $10,000 and also to a default penalty.

(5)  Any statement of affairs prepared under this section may be used in evidence against any person making or concurring in making it.

(6)  A copy of the company’s statement of affairs shall immediately be delivered by the judicial manager to the Registrar.

(7)  Any person making the statement and affidavit shall be allowed and shall be paid by the judicial manager, out of his receipts, such costs and expenses incurred in and about the preparation and making of the statement and affidavit as the judicial manager may consider reasonable, subject to an appeal to the Court.

Statement of proposals

227M.

—(1)  Where a judicial management order has been made, the judicial manager shall, within 60 days (or such longer period as the Court may allow) after the making of the order —

(a) send to the Registrar and (so far as he is aware of their addresses) to all creditors a statement of his proposals for achieving one or more of the purposes mentioned in section 227B(1)(b) for whose achievement the order was made; and

(b) lay a copy of the statement before a meeting of the company’s creditors summoned for the purpose on not less than 14 days’ notice.

(2)  The judicial manager shall also, within 60 days (or such longer period as the Court may allow) after the making of the order, either —

(a) send a copy of the statement (so far as he is aware of their addresses) to all members of the company; or

(b) publish a notice in an English and Chinese local daily newspaper stating an address to which members of the company should write for copies of the statement to be sent to them free of charge.

Consideration of proposals by creditors’ meeting

227N.

—(1)  A meeting of creditors, summoned under section 227M, shall decide whether to approve the judicial manager’s proposals.

(2)  At such meeting the majority in number and value of creditors, present and voting either in person or by proxy whose claims have been accepted by the judicial manager, may approve the proposals with modifications but shall not do so unless the judicial manager consents to each modification.

(3)  The judicial manager shall report the result of the meeting (which shall, subject to subsection (2), be conducted in accordance with regulations) to the Court and shall give notice of that result to the Registrar and to such other persons or bodies as the Court may approve.

(4)  If a report is given to the Court under subsection (3) that the meeting has declined to approve the judicial manager’s proposals (with or without modifications), the Court may by order discharge the judicial management order and make such consequential provision as it thinks fit, or adjourn the hearing conditionally or unconditionally, or make an interim order or any other order that it thinks fit. A copy of any order of Court made under this subsection shall be published in an English and Chinese local daily newspaper.

(5)  Where the judicial management order is discharged, the judicial manager shall immediately send to the Registrar a copy of the order effecting the discharge.

(6)  If the judicial manager, without reasonable excuse, fails to comply with subsection (5) he shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $5,000 and also to a default penalty.

Committee of creditors

227O.

—(1)  Where a meeting of creditors summoned under section 227M has approved the judicial manager’s proposals (with or without modifications), the meeting may, if it thinks fit, establish a committee to exercise the functions conferred on it under subsection (2).

(2)  If such a committee is established, the committee may require the judicial manager to attend before it and furnish it with such information relating to the carrying out by him of his functions as it may reasonably require.

Duty to manage company’s affairs, etc., in accordance with approved proposals

227P.

—(1)  Where the judicial manager’s proposals have been approved by a meeting of creditors summoned under section 227M, then, subject to any order under section 227R, it shall be the duty of the judicial manager to manage the affairs, business and property of the company in accordance with the proposals as from time to time revised by him.

(2)  Where the judicial manager proposes to make substantial revisions of his proposals as so approved, he shall —

(a) send to all creditors of the company (so far as he is aware of their addresses) a statement of his proposed revisions; and

(b) lay a copy of the statement before a meeting of the company’s creditors summoned for the purpose on not less than 14 days’ notice, and shall not make the proposed revisions unless they are approved by the majority in number and value of creditors present and voting in person or by proxy at the meeting whose claims have been accepted by the judicial manager.

(3)  The judicial manager shall also either —

(a) send a copy of the statement (so far as he is aware of their addresses) to all members of the company; or

(b) publish a notice in an English and Chinese local daily newspaper stating an address to which members of the company should write for copies of the statement to be sent to them free of charge.

(4)  A meeting of creditors summoned under subsection (2) (which shall, subject to subsection (2) and this subsection, be conducted in accordance with the regulations) may approve the proposed revisions with modifications but shall not do so unless the judicial manager consents to each modification.

(5)  After the conclusion of a meeting summoned under subsection (2), the judicial manager shall give notice of the result of the meeting to the Registrar or to such other persons or bodies as the Court may approve.

Duty to apply for discharge of judicial management order

227Q.

—(1)  The judicial manager of a company shall apply to the Court for the judicial management order to be discharged if it appears to him that the purpose or each of the purposes specified in the order either has been achieved or is incapable of achievement.

(2)  On the hearing of an application under this section, the Court may by order discharge the judicial management order and make such consequential provision as it thinks fit, or adjourn the hearing conditionally or unconditionally, or make an interim order or any other order it thinks fit.

(3)  Where the judicial management order is discharged, the judicial manager shall immediately send to the Registrar a copy of the order effecting the discharge.

(4)  Where a judicial management order has been discharged under this Part or where a person ceases to be a judicial manager pursuant to section 227J, the judicial manager may apply to the Court for his release and the Court may, if it thinks fit, make an order releasing him from liability in respect of any act or omission by him in the management of the company or otherwise in relation to his conduct as judicial manager but any such release shall not relieve him from liability for any misapplication or retention of money or property of the company or for which he has become accountable or from any law to which he would be subject in respect of negligence, default, misfeasance, breach of trust or breach of duty in relation to the company.

Protection of interests of creditors and members

227R.

—(1)  At any time when a judicial management order is in force, a creditor or member of the company may apply to the Court for an order under this section on the ground —

(a) that the company’s affairs, business and property are being or have been managed by the judicial manager in a manner which is or was unfairly prejudicial to the interests of its creditors or members generally or of some part of its creditors or members (including at least himself) or of a single creditor that represents one quarter in value of the claims against the company; or

(b) that any actual or proposed act or omission of the judicial manager is or would be so prejudicial

[13/87; 42/2005]

(2)  On an application for an order under this section, the Court may make such order as it thinks fit for giving relief in respect of the matters complained of, or adjourn the hearing conditionally or unconditionally, or make an interim order or any other order that it thinks fit

[13/87; 42/2005]

(3)  Subject to subsection (4), an order under this section may —

(a) regulate the future management by the judicial manager of the company’s affairs, business and property;

(b) require the judicial manager to refrain from doing or continuing an act complained of by the applicant or to do an act which the applicant has complained he has omitted to do;

(c) require the summoning of a meeting of creditors or members for the purpose of considering such matters as the Court may direct;

(d) discharge the judicial management order and make such consequential provision as it thinks fit

[13/87; 42/2005]

(4)  An order under this section shall not prejudice or prevent the implementation of any composition or scheme approved under section 210.

(5)  Where the judicial management order is discharged, the judicial manager shall immediately send to the Registrar a copy of the order effecting the discharge.

(6)  If the judicial manager, without reasonable excuse, fails to comply with subsection (5) he shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $5,000 and also to a default penalty.

Trade union representation on behalf of members who are creditors and employees of a company

227S.

—(1)  Where employees of a company are creditors, by reason that wages or salary are payable to them whether by way of allowance or reimbursement under contracts of employment or any award or agreement regulating conditions of employment or otherwise, and where the employees are members of a trade union that is recognised by the company under the Industrial Relations Act (Cap. 136), it shall be sufficient compliance by the judicial manager with sections 227K, 227M and 227N if the notice, statement of proposals or revised proposals referred to therein are sent to the trade union representing the employees.

(2)  A trade union to which subsection (1) applies shall be entitled to represent any such employees at a meeting of creditors summoned under section 227M or, with leave of the Court, to apply to the Court under section 227R on their behalf or may make representations to the judicial manager on behalf of those employees in respect of —

(a) any matter connected with or arising from the continuation or termination of their contracts of employment under section 227I; or

(b) any matter relating to any award made by the Industrial Arbitration Court under the Industrial Relations Act (Cap. 136) or any collective agreement certified under that Act that affects those employees

[13/87; 42/2005]

Undue preference in case of judicial management

227T.

—(1)  Subject to this Act and such modifications as may be prescribed, a settlement, a conveyance or transfer of property, a charge on property, a payment made or an obligation incurred by a company which if it had been made or incurred by a natural person would in the event of his becoming a bankrupt be void as against the Official Assignee under section 98, 99 or 103 of the Bankruptcy Act (Cap. 20) (read with sections 100, 101 and 102 thereof) shall, in the event of the company being placed under judicial management, be void as against the judicial manager

[13/87; 15/95]

(2)  For the purposes of subsection (1), the date that corresponds with the date of the application for a bankruptcy order in the case of a natural person and the date on which a person is adjudged bankrupt is the date on which an application for a judicial management order is made

[13/87; 42/2005]

Delivery and seizure of property

227U.

—(1)  Where any of the persons mentioned in subsection (2) has in his possession or control any property, books, papers or records to which the company appears to be entitled, the Court may require that person immediately (or within such period as the Court may direct) to pay, deliver, convey, surrender or transfer the property, books, papers or records to the judicial manager.

(2)  The persons referred to in subsection (1) are —

(a) a contributory or member of the company;

(b) any person who has previously held office as receiver or receiver and manager of the company’s property; and

(c) any trustee for, or any banker, agent or officer of, the company.

(3)  Where —

(a) the judicial manager seizes or disposes of any property which is not the property of the company; and

(b) at the time of seizure or disposal the judicial manager believes, and has reasonable grounds for believing, that he is entitled (whether in pursuance of an order of the Court or otherwise) to seize or dispose of that property, the judicial manager shall not be liable to any person in respect of any loss or damage resulting from the seizure or disposal except in so far as that loss or damage is caused by the negligence of the judicial manager and the judicial manager shall have a lien on the property, or the proceeds of its sale, for such expenses as were incurred in connection with the seizure or disposal.

Duty to co-operate with judicial manager

227V.

—(1)  Each of the persons mentioned in subsection (2) shall —

(a) give to the judicial manager such information concerning the company and its promotion, formation, business, dealings, affairs or property as the judicial manager may at any time after the date of the judicial management order reasonably require; and

(b) attend on the judicial manager at such times as the judicial manager may reasonably require.

(2)  The persons referred to in subsection (1) are —

(a) those who are or have at any time been officers of the company;

(b) those who have taken part in the formation of the company at any time within one year before the date of the judicial management order; and

(c) those who are in the employment of the company, or have been in its employment, and are, in the judicial manager’s opinion, capable of giving information which he requires.

(3)  If a person, without reasonable excuse, fails to comply with any obligation imposed by this section, he shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $10,000 and also to a default penalty.

Inquiry into company’s dealings, etc.

227W.

—(1)  The Court may, on the application of the judicial manager, summon to appear before it —

(a) any officer of the company;

(b) any person known or suspected to have in his possession any property of the company or supposed to be indebted to the company; or

(c) any person whom the Court thinks capable of giving information concerning the promotion, formation, business, dealings, affairs or property of the company, and the Court may require any such person as is mentioned in paragraphs (a) to (c) to submit an affidavit to the Court containing an account of his dealings with the company or to produce any books, papers or other records in his possession or under his control relating to the company or the matters mentioned in paragraph (c).

(2)  In a case where a person, without reasonable excuse, fails to appear before the Court when he is summoned to do so under this section or there are reasonable grounds for believing that a person has absconded, or is about to abscond, with a view to avoiding his appearance before the Court under this section, the Court may, for the purpose of bringing that person and anything in his possession before the Court, cause a warrant to be issued to a police officer —

(a) for the arrest of that person; and

(b) for the seizure of any books, papers, records, money or goods in that person’s possession, and may authorise a person arrested under such a warrant to be kept in custody, and anything seized under such a warrant to be held until that person is brought before the Court under the warrant or until such other time as the Court may order.

(3)  Any person who appears or is brought before the Court under this section may be examined on oath, either orally or by interrogatories, concerning the company or the matters mentioned in subsection (1)(c).

(4)  If it appears to the Court, on consideration of any evidence obtained under this section, that any person has in his possession any property of the company, the Court may, on the application of the judicial manager, order that person to deliver the whole or any part of the property to the judicial manager at such time, in such manner and on such terms as the Court thinks fit.

(5)  If it appears to the Court, on consideration of any evidence obtained under this section, that any person is indebted to the company, the Court may, on the application of the judicial manager, after examining that person on the matter, order that person to pay to the judicial manager, at such time and in such manner as the Court may direct, the whole or any part of the amount due, whether in full discharge of the debt or otherwise, as the Court thinks fit.

(6)  The Court may, if it thinks fit, order that any person, who if within Singapore would be summoned to appear before it under this section, to be examined in a place outside Singapore.

Application of certain provisions in Parts VII and X to a company under judicial management

227X.  At any time when a judicial management order is in force in relation to a company under judicial management —

(a) section 210 shall apply as if for subsections (1) and (3) thereof there were substituted the following:

“(1)  Where a compromise or arrangement is proposed between a company and its creditors, the Court may on the application of the judicial manager order a meeting of creditors to be summoned in such manner as the Court directs.

(3)  If three-fourths in value of the creditors present and voting either in person or by proxy at the meeting agree to any compromise or arrangement, the compromise or arrangement shall, if approved by the Court, be binding on all the creditors and on the judicial manager.”; and

(b) sections 337, 340, 341 and 342 shall apply as if the company under judicial management were a company being wound up and the judicial manager were the liquidator, but this shall be without prejudice to the power of the Court to order that any other section in Part X shall apply to a company under judicial management as if it applied in a winding up by the Court and any reference to the liquidator shall be taken as a reference to the judicial manager and any reference to a contributory as a reference to a member of the company.

Singapore Companies Act Singapore Companies Act Singapore Companies Act
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